Norfolk County owns and operates five separate water treatment systems. Click on any of the following to read more about each treatment system.


 

Delhi and Courtland Water Treatment System

Delhi Drinking Water System is a combination of well and surface water supply consisting of two raw water well sources, a surface water filtration plant, and a water standpipe. The two wells are located to the east of town at 2497 and 2529 Windham West Quarter Line. The surface water intake is upstream of Lehman’s Dam at 391 Old Mill Road. The Delhi Drinking Water System provides drinking water to the communities of Delhi and Courtland.

At Lehman’s Dam filtration Plant, the raw water enters the plant where the flow and turbidity is measured. Sodium hypochlorite (chlorine) is then added for disinfection. After disinfection, Polyaluminum Chloride (PAC) is added for the purpose of flocculation. The water then flows through a series of flocculation channels, which promote the formation of floc. Water then enters a single sedimentation tank, which has tube settlers to improve the solids removal and reduce carryover of settleable material (floc).

Hydrofluosilicic acid (fluoride) is then added prior to entering the horizontal pressure filters which contain anthracite, silica sand and silica gravel. After the water leaves the filters, the flow and turbidity are monitored before the water enters the Ultraviolet (UV) Disinfection Reactors. The final stage of the treatment process is the addition of sodium hypochlorite, a second application to insure proper disinfection is obtained. Treated water is monitored before leaving the plant by online analyzers, which measure pH and chlorine residual.

At the two wells, water from each well is pumped and flows through an inline magnetic flow meter that measures the flow. The next step is the disinfection process, which consists of two UV disinfection units and then the addition of sodium hypochlorite (chlorine). Hydrofluosilicic acid is then added for fluoridation followed by sodium silicate, which is added for iron suspension purposes (iron sequestering). The water then flows into distribution, connecting into the south end of the Delhi distribution system on Wilson Ave.

 

Port Dover Water Treatment System

Port Dover Drinking Water System is a surface water based supply that draws its water from Lake Erie and consists of a clarifier, filters, reservoir and an elevated water storage tank. The intake pipe and water works facilities are located at 603 Nelson St.

The first step in the treatment process is the injection of carbon dioxide into the raw water to lower the pH as needed and then the addition of sodium hypochlorite for pre-chlorination.

The raw water enters the plant and the flow is measured with a magnetic flow meter. The next step in the process is the addition of Polyaluminum Chloride (PAC) as a coagulant followed by an inline rapid mixer, which starts the formation of the floc. The water then flows into a clarifier where the floc settles and is automatically removed. The clarifier produces water with reduced solids, which is more suitable for further treatment by the three gravity filters. The filters contain silica sand and activated carbon filter media with a layer of gravel at the bottom to support the media. The water flows down through the media, which removes any remaining particulate matter.

The final step in the treatment process is post-chlorination with the addition of sodium hypochlorite prior to the water entering the small reservoirs. The water leaving the plant is monitored with online instruments for free chlorine, pH, turbidity, pressure and flow.

 

Port Rowan and St. Williams Water Treatment System

The Port Rowan Drinking Water System is a surface water based supply that draws its water from Lake Erie and consists of a filter plant, elevated water storage tank and a booster pumping station in St. Williams. The water works facilities are located at 4 Archibald Drive. The Port Rowan Drinking Water System provides drinking water to the communities of Port Rowan and St. Williams, as well as the Booth’s Harbour Private Drinking Water System.

The raw water from the intake pipe is pumped up to the treatment plant. Carbon dioxide is injected into the water to lower the pH as needed. The water is then injected with Poly Aluminum Chloride (PAC) to aid in the coagulation process, and sodium hypochlorite is also added for pre-chlorination. Online analyzers that measure pre-chlorine, turbidity and pH monitor raw water entering the plant to help operators make treatment decisions.

After the chemical additions, the water passes through a static mixer prior to entering one of two Ecodyne Monoplant package treatment plants. The first stage in the filtration process occurs when the water enters the flocculation chamber, where a slow moving mixer helps the coagulant form a settleable and filterable floc, which consists of suspended solids, including some bacteria and viruses. Automatic blowdown valves located on the bottom of the settling compartment remove the solids or floc, which have settled.

The water then flows through the settling compartment into the dual media filters, which use anthracite and sand to remove particulates. The water is then pumped to the two high pressure Granular Activated Carbon (GAC) filters. These filters provide further filtration and also help to control taste and odour problems. The water from the GAC filters then flows through one of two UV disinfection units. The water is then post-chlorinated with sodium hypochlorite and monitored for free chlorine residual. On its way out, the water is monitored for pH, turbidity and free and chlorine residual before entering the distribution system.

 

Simcoe Water Treatment System

Simcoe Drinking Water System is a well-based supply consisting of eight raw water well sources, an infiltration gallery, an iron and manganese removal plant, two reservoirs and a water tower. There are five wells, an infiltration gallery, and a reservoir located on Cedar St. beside Colonel Stalker Park and one well on Chapel Street at Waterworks Park. There is also a reservoir and two wells northwest of town on Fourteenth St. West.

At the Cedar Street Wells, the raw water from the five wells and the infiltration gallery enters the treatment building where primary disinfection takes place. The first stage of treatment is the Ultraviolet (UV) treatment system. The second stage is the addition of sodium hypochlorite (chlorine). The water then has sodium silicate added for sequestering iron and manganese and also hydrofluosilicic acid (fluoride). Prior to the water entering the reservoir it is monitored for free chorine residual. Water leaving the Reservoir is monitored again for free chlorine residual and turbidity, and sodium hypochlorite is added again to ensure secondary disinfection in the distribution system. Water from the reservoir is pumped from one or more of the three Booster Station pumps and provides treated water to the distribution system and to fill the water tower.

At the Chapel Street Well, the water is pumped from the ground and flows through an inline magnetic flow meter that measures the flow. The first step in the treatment process is the addition of sodium hypochlorite for primary disinfection. Hydrofluosilicic acid (fluoride) is then added. The water then flows through the chlorine contact chamber and then enters the distribution system.

At the Northwest Filter Plant, the water is pumped directly from the two Northwest wells. The first stage of the process is the addition of Poly Aluminum Chloride (PAC), which is a polymer that enhances the filtering process. Then sodium hypochlorite is added for pre-filter disinfection and as a primary oxidant, followed by sodium permanganate as a secondary oxidant. The next step in the process is the reaction tank where the oxidation of the iron and manganese takes place. The water then flows into the filtration system, which consists of three steel high-pressure filters containing mesh ceramic filter media.

The water leaving each filter is monitored by an online turbidity analyzer. Chemical addition, including hydrofluosilicic acid (fluoride) and sodium hypochlorite are added for post-filter disinfection. The water then flows into the Northwest Reservoir where the chlorine has time to properly disinfect. After the water is pumped from the reservoir it is monitored by an online free chlorine residual analyzer prior to post chlorination with sodium hypochlorite and is then monitored again by online analyzers for free chlorine residual and turbidity before entering the distribution system.

 

Waterford Water Treatment System

Waterford Drinking Water System is a well based supply consisting of two raw water well sources, a manganese and iron removal plant, and a water standpipe. The wells and treatment facilities are at 373 Thompson Road.

The water treatment plant is fed by two groundwater well sources. A manganese and iron removal plant was put into operation in 2004 to eliminate problems experienced in the distribution system due to the high levels of manganese.

Water flows from the wells into the water treatment plant where Polyaluminum Chloride (PAC), sodium permanganate and sodium hypochlorite are added prior to a reaction chamber to help oxidize the iron and manganese. After sufficient reaction time in the chamber, the water then passes through one of the three pressure filters that contain mesh ceramic filter media.

From the filters, water travels through a pipe where sodium hypochlorite is injected, and sits in a clearwell to allow the chlorine time to disinfect. The water is then pumped to the water distribution system.